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earlthompsonj

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Posts: 1
Reply with quote  #1 

How to deal with tenants that what everything done in the house. How to keep the peace and not do anything.Email me at earlthompsonjr@yahoo.com

OHlandlord

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Posts: 3,718
Reply with quote  #2 
I have posted about this several times.  Please do a search here for old posts on this.

Basically, there are 3 types of repairs - emergency repairs, needed repairs, and cosmetic repairs.  Emergency repairs affect the habitability of a unit and must be completed quickly, usually within 72 hours.  Examples would be electrical problems, lack of heat, or total loss of water in a unit.

Needed repairs are things you should fix to keep the unit in good condition, to keep things operating that are included in the lease, or to ensure small problems do not become bigger ones.  Examples are a small leak, repair of a dishwasher, or replacing a cracked window pane.  These things should be completed within 30 days of being reported to you.

Cosmetic repairs are things that do not need to be fixed to comply with the lease or to keep the unit habitable.  Examples would be requests for new paint, carpet, new appliances, etc.  Things that they can live without.  They rented the unit in this condition and do not have a right to ask for something different.  You can deny these requests outright.  Do these things after a tenant has vacated.

For tenants who continually request things:  All requests must be in writing except emergency ones.  Even those should be followed up in writing after calling you.  Make up a form for this and give them to the tenant to complete.. The form should include name, address, date, what needs fixed, why it needs fixed, how it broke, etc. plus should have a bottom part for you to mark which type of repair it is, whether you approved or denied the repair, and an estimated time to fix the problem.  It should also include a release that allows you to enter to fix the problem.  (By signing the form they authorize you entry to make repairs.) 

Do nothing but emergency repairs without the form.  Just keep stating that you need the form in writing to do the repair.  Don't answer their phone calls if they just keep demanding things.  Let the machine pick it up.  Take your time calling them back if not an emergency.  Then reiterate your policy ("I need it in writing...".)  They will quickly tire of writing out the forms and being denied for cosmetic things.  They will learn to fill it out for only needed items.

Also, make the tenant responsible for his own minor maintenance issues (NOT REPAIRS!).  The tenants should plunge their own toilet, change their own light bulbs and smoke detector batteries, etc.  When they call to get a bulb replaced, I tell them "I can do that but there will be a charge for it.  That it your responsibility."  I only change those that are so high that a long ladder would be needed (like those at the top of a stairwell).  They can do the rest. 

Also, start charging them for tenant caused problems.  If the toilet needs fixed by a plumber who finds one of the tenants' child's toys in it, they get the plumber's bill. It was their fault, they are responsible for it.  Same with any appliance that they overload, misuse, or in any way break.  If the repair person said it was the tenant's fault (have him write this on the bill) they get the bill.  Write this into future leases.

Feel free to post any questions about this.
Newevent

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Posts: 9
Reply with quote  #3 
Bad tenants were two months in arrears. They were evicted. They did not move. The sheriff was consulted. The locks were changed, with tenant possessions to be sold off to recoup losses. They broke in, stayed at the house anyway. Most of their possessions are junk anyway. The house was full of trash. The yard was full of trash. The parquetry floors are damaged. The doors are damaged. The kitchen drawers are missing (??!!). Mum changed the locks again. They broke in again. She had the yard cleared at a cost of a few grand (it's a big yard), and is about to get hit for the bill for cleaning out the house itself...then she'll have to deal with the actual damage to the floors/walls/doors etc. She's getting the locks changed a third time. The bond she's kept will not cover the clean up costs in any way, and she's had to make several insurance claims along the way.
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Marytmary1978

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Posts: 445
Reply with quote  #4 

Newevent-

Did you have the people arrested?  You should have.

amygarside

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Posts: 28
Reply with quote  #5 
You might want to contact the police. Also, you might want to consult with a lawyer and ask if you could sue them for trespassing. 
Wyndesor

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Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #6 
Mary and Amy are right, the law needs to be involved. If you can prove that it was them, they could be found guilty of criminal trespassing, damage to property, and who knows what else. Even if you can't prove it was them so far, get the law involved so you can have something in the future if you need it. It may be the only way to recoup costs, and keep your insurance bills from skyrocketing.
seanmoore1712

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Posts: 20
Reply with quote  #7 
If you get a service of tenant screening you can avoid this kind of mess.Tenant screening is a simple, time-saving and potentially cost-saving measure. By uncovering a prospective tenant's personal and financial history, landlords can mitigate the chance of any future problems.
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http://ctcredit.net/tenant_screening.html - Fast and affordable tenant screening services
Marybeth

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Posts: 8
Reply with quote  #8 
These kinds of situations are what I fear most in being a new landlord. I agree that tenant screening is important for landlords, and I have a screening company that I use (www.e-renter.com). However, it is still hard to know what tenants to rent to. I've been fortunate in my short time of being a landlord, but I think that all landlords face a problematic tenant at some point or another. Tenant screening certainly helps to prevent run ins with bad tenants.
rflores99

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Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #9 
Here's a good one for you all.  Earlier this year, I was "blessed" (in my best sarcastic tone) with tenants who didn't have children...they had dogs.  We allowed them to have their dogs.  HOWEVER, a few months into their lease, they called me to let me know that they came across a bunch of roaches behind the fridge.  I live on the first floor.  I told them that they were responsible for getting rid of these pests and even told them "It's something you're doing because I live on the first floor and don't have them.  Roaches don't sit outside debating what floor they're going to invade."  SUPPOSEDLY, they never saw these pests again.  They moved out for lack of payment of rent.  However, they left their little friends behind.  Does anyone know if I can sue them for Orkin having come out to my house for pest control ???  I have to pay $660 for Orkin to rid me of these pests !!!!
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Rosa
mzlandlord

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Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #10 
What do you do with a tenant that wants to do his own repairs? He doesn't want anyone in his apartment but he will do the repair and deduct from the rent the cost of the repair.
we have good handymen and would like to use them
rflores99

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Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #11 

I wouldn't let them.  You have to remember that although they are paying rent, ultimately this is still YOUR property.  Yes they occupy space and pay for it but it's YOUR investment NOT theirs.  Don't run the risk of them having shotty workmenship done and then charge you for it.  If there are repairs that have to get done to ANY particular unit, YOU make the necessary arrangements.  Whether you do them yourself or you hire someone you trust.  Keep in mind that it is REALLY easy to falsify an invoice for work performed.  Whether or not the work has been actually performed is an entirely different story. 


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Rosa
mzlandlord

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Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #12 

Thank you Rosa! I was just wondering if he legally he has to right the make the repair and charge me without my permission

rflores99

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Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #13 
No he does not have permission.  I'm in Chicago and I KNOW that when it comes to MY building (which I also live in myself) I MAKE all the calls.  If my tenants don't like it, they have the right to move.  Just be careful.  It's hard to be a landlord.  When someone told me that homeownership was "The American Dream" this is certainly NOT what I expected.  I've had just about every tenant (good and bad) in the book.
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Rosa
shagydeep

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Posts: 18
Reply with quote  #14 
Hello,
Basically you need to have all inquiry of your tenant like it's past residential address and his working place and all. Make an agreement of whatever time you are giving to him on rent...
chris011

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Posts: 23
Reply with quote  #15 
To be honest it is really hard to deal with a bad tenants and you really need to be patient cause when i was in Finland and working as an ulkoinen viestint√§ or external communication i experience having difficulties on dealing with tenant .
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