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xfactor54

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Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #1 

Tenant Txt is a the service that apartment management or apartment safety leaders can put in place in order to single or mass alert their community of any maintenance repairs, criminal activity, or community events by text message and email. Check us out by searching Tenant Txt in any major search engine.

OHlandlord

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Posts: 3,734
Reply with quote  #2 
That would be a fine way to deliver general information, but should not replace a written notice.  There would be no guarantee that the tenant would get that notice so it wouldn't hold up in court as an official notice of repairs to be done, notice of intent to enter the property, or other official notice that was required.  There is no way to prove the tenant received the notice or saw it.  His phone could be turned off, uncharged, broken, or his service provider down. You could not show a text message in court as an official notice to the tenant.  This, like e-mail, would be helpful; but it should not be considered for use in cases where official notice is needed.  You still need the old fashioned written paper copy to show in court.
yikes

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Posts: 383
Reply with quote  #3 
I agree with OH, it's good to have a legit paper trail (when sending important notices I like to use certified mail).  And, on a personal note, I really hate it when tenants text me.   For some reason I feel like texting is informal and should be between close friends and family for unimportant messages, like, 'miss u' or 'love u'  (haha, I sound so cold.  Not that love is unimportant, but you know what I mean), and not to be used for repair notices and important info.  If something is important, I feel it warrants a phone call.
I also notice that tenants prefer to text me when they don't want to deal with me.  Like if I'm after them for rent, I'll get a text saying it's in the mail or some other lousy excuse.  They will do this in lieu of calling me and speaking to me...

xfactor54

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Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #4 
Thank you for your comments on Tenant Txt. "Yikes" if something is that important then you need to get the message out by all and every means necessary. Also an important message to a family member like "I love you" or "I miss you" sounds way more meaningful by phone call instead of a text message.

Tenant Txt has mailing stats that shows proof when your mailing was sent out and who it was sent to for proof.

What I guess I'm not understanding as a renter and correct me if I'm wrong but how long does it take management to go to every unit in your community? How much paper, ink and money is wasted on one notification that the residents need to know about immediately?

How do you verify that your resident received the paper posting and it didn't blow away? How long will it take to call 500 units to tell them they are repaving the parking lot or the water heaters froze and busted because it was to cold? And who's going to be the brave soul to tell the residents?

These are real concerns as a renter and those are a couple of things that has happened to me. The service is not to be missed used and if people can't understand that then their account is cancelled.
OHlandlord

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Posts: 3,734
Reply with quote  #5 
It really doesn't matter if the paper notice blows away.  The point is that state laws and courts set the methods of notice that are legal forms of notice in that state.  No state allows e-mail or text message as a legal form of notice yet.  If it were to go to court, posting it to the door is a legal method of notice in most states.  Even if the tenant didn't receive it, as long as you can prove you posted it (dated digital photo of it on the door is permitted as proof) a court considers it as legal notice.  Texting the tenant is not.  So letting the tenant know he needs to have the car moved for paving would not be a legal form of notice if texted.  He could fail to move the car and could sue you if you were to tow it.  However, post that notice to his door, and you can legally tow the car if you include that in the notice.

I can see where this texting and e-mailing would be useful for non-essential things.  (Office to close on the holiday, new landscaping to be installed, etc.)  But if it is an issue that could cause friction or a suit later, the notice should be written.

As for tenants texting the LL, it shouldn't be done that way.  It is not considered a written notice of repairs.  Most states require a written notice of repairs to be made to a LL before they can avail themselves of any other form of remedy available (like rent withholding or repair & deduct remedies).  If a tenant texts this repair request and it is not done, he cannot use these remedies because he failed to follow the law that requires a WRITTEN request be made. Tell your tenants outright that texts and emails are not considered legal notice for any repair or late rent.  All repair requests, except emergencies, need to be made in writing.  Providing a form for them reinforces that idea.

yikes

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Posts: 383
Reply with quote  #6 
I follow the law to the letter with regard to my landlording job.  I do this to protect myself, my properties, my rights as a landlord, and my tenants.  I do this to streamline the process and simplify any potential issues that may surface.  It's not about saving paper and ink, it's about saving my butt from being sued and losing. 

Many older tenants don't even use text messaging, and as their landlord I certainly can't force them to do so.

OH, I agree that tenants texting the landlord is not okay.  Each time I get a text, I remind them of how to request repairs or contact me, but alas some will continue to do it.  Usually it's because they are late on rent and don't want to have to talk to me, so they'll send a text message to my phone instead of calling.  Annoying.




OHlandlord

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Posts: 3,734
Reply with quote  #7 
I understand what you are saying yikes.  You always want to CYA.

Try this.  When you get a text from them, call them.  Leave a message for them that you "received some type of message and saw it was their number, but there must be something wrong with your phone because there weren't any words.  It was just all jumbled up symbols!  You don't know what it was that they were trying to tell you.  You sure hope nothing is wrong.  Shall I stop by in case it is an emergency?"  See if they don't call or text you again.  (If they text again, call back sounding even more worried!  Maybe you should stop over right away!)  Pretty soon, they will stop trying to text you.

Sometimes playing dumb works.  No one texts me anymore.  Guess my phone just is compatible with their text messages?

And when they call me for repairs, I drop a blank repair form off for them on their door.  The notice of the top says "no work, except emergency repairs, can be done without this form".
MOON

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Posts: 577
Reply with quote  #8 

I could see where tenant txt would be helpful in an apartment complex situation.But I have been told by attorney's it is not to replace written notices when court is involved. You will have to get the courts to change the laws as to what is acceptable & court admissable tenant contact. 

yikes

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Posts: 383
Reply with quote  #9 
LOL, that is a great idea OH.  Just act confused.  I am going to do that, for real! 
The tenant that keeps texting me is leaving next week.  YAY!  Not 'yay' solely because of text messaging, but because she pays rent late, and is a general PITA. 

MOON - Agreed. The law is usually slow to catch up to technology.   Not only are most judges quite old, but the law really hates to change old precedent.  Just think, the Statue of Frauds, for example (requiring certain transactions to be in writing and signed) has been in effect since the 1600s!  They don't like to just wipe that out.  I've read cases where they try to pass an email off as a document that satisfies the Statue of Frauds (because it's in writing!) but courts usually have issue with the signature part of it.  They want to see a John Hancock on there somewhere.  So now the issue is, does typing your name at the bottom of the email qualify as a signature?  We'll see where all of this ends up, but it will take years no doubt.
Some property law is messed up.  I will never understand adverse possession. 
Sam

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Posts: 563
Reply with quote  #10 

The company I work for has recently started doing e-signatures (return this email stating "signed") for audit related documents and statements -- seems as though not too many ink signatures are needed anymore, except for contracts.  Maybe the procedures are changing.  There must be something out there that considers a "signed" email a legitimate document (Company is an "Inc.")

OHlandlord

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Posts: 3,734
Reply with quote  #11 
A "signed" e-mail is no better than an unsigned one where court is concerned.  In all matters of rentals issues where it may possibly come to court later, make sure you stay with the old standby - snail mail or written notice.  Those hold up in court in all cases.  And no state I know of allows e-mail to be used for official notices of any kind.
bobkerry

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Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #12 

well i think the above mentioned all the things are totally correct.....you can also seacrh avout this from different sites......

prin1113ci

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Posts: 86
Reply with quote  #13 
Obtain addresses for e-mail and text messages from the tenant at the start of the were taken to contact the tenant and arrange for removal of the property.


fake doctors note


HortonEdward

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Posts: 8
Reply with quote  #14 
To be honest i never seen a text message or email stuff in a rental stuff and for me this is a impressive service.
Joe_Black

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Posts: 1
Reply with quote  #15 
I pesonally don't like texting too often, especially to people who I don't feel close or have only business relatonships with them. That's why I find it most appropriate to ring my tenants. Emails or messages in Facebook are good too, but sometimes your words may be understood the wrong way. So, for me personal contact is best.
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