Start your membership account today...  Access to credit reports, 100's of rental specific forms, agreements, letters, checklists, how-to articles, guides, expert advice and much more!  Even a FREE, 3-day trial!

Not a Member?
Get a Free Trial Membership

  Get FREE Stuff! Run Credit Report Rental Forms  Shop & Buy Forms!  Advertise Your Rental Customer Care

Welcome to Landlord.com's Discussion Forum
Register Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Krystallin

Registered:
Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #1 
I have a friend who rents an apartment in Denver, Colorado. They have heat included in their bills, however, the landlord won't turn on the heat till the end of October. It is dipping into the low 40s overnight already and their place is very cold. What are the laws in Colorado regarding heat? Can a landlord wait to provide heat till end of October legally?
__________________
Free Landlord Software - http://www.turbotenant.com
AccidentalRental

Registered:
Posts: 53
Reply with quote  #2 
I did a quick search and couldn't find anything about when a landlord must provide heat (time of year, temperature, etc.). Colorado landlords only seems to have a duty to provide a habitable living space fit for humans.   Many cities like NY are very clear on the subject of heat.  This doesn't seem to be the case with Denver.

What does the lease say exactly about the heat? Have they asked the landlord to turn it on and they refused?  Document the temperature inside in case they need to file a complaint. 

Have them contact the Colorado Division of Housing to see if they have any advice or guidance.

__________________
Domenick | AccidentalRental - A profitable resource for new landlords

LLinVA

Registered:
Posts: 225
Reply with quote  #3 
Definitely do some digging, I would be surprised if neither the city nor the state had some sort of definition about when heat and AC are required. Maybe the city doesn't because it is so clearly stated by the state. In Virginia, it is clearly defined. Even if it is vaguely required to be habitable, I think it would be an easy argument that the space getting below 60F would be uninhabitable. He should let the landlord know if he is going to go to the city or state over this, that might be enough to fix the problem (and for a lot less hassle). 
Krystallin

Registered:
Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #4 
This is super helpful. All I could dig up was state law that says heat has to be working and the place habitable. He did ask the landlord to turn the heat on and was told they will turn it on at the end of October. For Colorado, that's really too late in the season to be fair! Especially with the cold snap we got this year. I'll definitely pass along this advice. 
__________________
Free Landlord Software - http://www.turbotenant.com
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.

Apartment Finders > > Member Log-in > Free Trial Offer > Free E-newsletter > Customer Service > Get Free Stuff! > Run Credit Report > Rental Forms > Vacancy Center > Do-it-yourself > Evicting Your Tenant > Foreclosure Resources > Landlord Discussion Board > Income Tax Resources > Information Center > Join Landlord.com > Landlord Law > Library > Multi-family > Professional Advice > Rental & Property Mgmt > Rent Collection > Repair & Maintenance > Security Deposit > Software Center > Tenant Screening > Vacation Homes > What's New > Rental Agreements > Free Leases > Inside Our E-store > > Security Deposits > > Landlord Daily News > Rental Agreements >
LandscapingSanJose.net Resources: Cleaner Sunshine coast