Start your membership account today...  Access to credit reports, 100's of rental specific forms, agreements, letters, checklists, how-to articles, guides, expert advice and much more!  Even a FREE, 3-day trial!

Not a Member?
Get a Free Trial Membership

  Get FREE Stuff! Run Credit Report Rental Forms  Shop & Buy Forms!  Advertise Your Rental Customer Care

Welcome to Landlord.com's Discussion Forum
Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
pab

Registered:
Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #1 

I have a property (house) that I am going to be renting.  The next door neighbors have made it abundantly clear they would like to rent it should it become available.  One would think, ‘great, a convenient tenant,’ and I wouldn’t have to search or advertise.  But flags are going up in my mind.  A little about the renters:  They just bought the house next door to mine about a year ago.  Owner is a single mother in her 40’s/50’s and her 20-something son lives with her.  On top of that they have taken in at least 3 or 4 homeless children from the shelter, for which they are undoubtedly receiving a payment (possibly that helps with their mortgage?).  The neighbor mother states that she wants to rent my house for a friend who is a caregiver for her mother.  So, theoretically, it would just be the friend and the neighbor’s elderly mother.  However, my cynical mind keeps playing out scenarios such as their taking on additional homeless children and who know what?  They would essentially have a small compound and who know what would happen?  I fear it would become essentially one household with members of both houses intermingling.  There is also the issue if something were to go awry, it might create future ill-will with neighbors directly next to my house!  The old adage “don’t do business with friends (and neighbors?) comes to mind.” 

I don’t feel my neighbors would be torch-bearing angry if I were to rent to someone else, but it might be awkward trying to explain why I didn’t rent to them, when they have been so aggressive in their pursuit.

Any insights or advice would be greatly appreciated.  Thank you.

AccidentalRental

Registered:
Posts: 203
Reply with quote  #2 
That's a tricky one.  I'm assuming you are on good terms with this neighbor now and want to keep it that way. 

I would politely tell the mother that whoever lives there has to be on the lease and able to meet your screening requirements.  You can't make any exceptions to this or you can get into trouble.  Presumably the caregiver and the elderly mother can't meet the requirement so you will be off the hook.  Offer to waive the application fee and background check as a courtesy. 

__________________
AccidentalRental - A profitable resource for new landlords

pab

Registered:
Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #3 

Thank you for your reply Accidentalrental!  I so appreciate your time in responding.  Yes, I do want to maintain good relations with them.  I fear that if I disqualify them on screening requirements it would somehow offend them.  I forgot to mention that the income for some of the rent would be some sort of financial support the elderly mother receives.  I don’t know whether that is S.S., disability or what? 

I am curious, may I please ask what your personal, gut reaction is to this situation?  Would you feel similarly concerned, or am I obsessing too much? 

Please anyone else reading this you don’t have to have a solution to reply (although that would be nice!).  I would really appreciate your personal opinion on the situation and whether you would be concerned renting to them? 

Thank you, all.

LizaMoretz

Registered:
Posts: 1
Reply with quote  #4 
Don’t do business with friends and neighbors. This adage it's true. You need to rent the house to someone else. I will use your situation for my essay in https://supremeessays.org/samples/management.html

__________________
 
AccidentalRental

Registered:
Posts: 203
Reply with quote  #5 
I would probably share your concerns and go with my gut on this one.  I'm curious to hear from others too. 
__________________
AccidentalRental - A profitable resource for new landlords

LLinVA

Registered:
Posts: 545
Reply with quote  #6 
I agree. You have to treat it like any other applicant. If the caregiver (and possibly the mother) can actually qualify on their own and you would have approved them had you not know they were associated with the neighbor, then move forward. But no matter what, you have to go through all checks, have a proper lease, have good rules, enforce the rules, etc. Exceptions will kill you in this industry. 

pab

Registered:
Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #7 

Thank you, everyone, for your replies.  Please keep them coming.  The elephant in the room for me is that the neighbors have kids - and while I do not believe they would move in as additional tenants, I fear they would spend considerable time there, being cared for, babysat, take some meals there or whatever.  And this is a difficult subject to broach with them due to ‘familial’ rental laws, etc.  I would like to be upfront with them and state that the house is for the use of the two tenants on the lease and my expectations are such that it would not be a center for child caring or playground for the kids.   Or is that too candid (or illegal)?

LLinVA

Registered:
Posts: 545
Reply with quote  #8 
I think you will have a tough time prohibiting someone from providing free childcare to their own family members. You can talk to an attorney about it, but I doubt that would hold. Prohibiting an at-home daycare would be fine, but not allowing extended family to visit would be tough outside of long-term stays that could constitute residency.

Again, I would ignore all these irrelevant details, accept the application, apply the same standards as anyone else, and approve or not based on the facts, not your worries and their happening to be related. Any of that crap will get you in trouble. Credit and income are what you need to focus on. I'm guessing that will give you the fully legal grounds to not approve their application.
OHlandlord

Registered:
Posts: 3,814
Reply with quote  #9 
#1 rule:  I never rent to friends, relatives, or co-workers, or any combination thereof. 
#2 rule:  Beware of anyone who is overly anxious to get into your house.

That said, I don't care if they take in foster kids, as long as they still meet the occupancy limits based on the size of the home.  Good for them to help those kids.

If they want to rent it for mom, mom and any live in need to complete an application and undergo screening and qualification checks.  She needs 3 times the rent in income.  If not and they want to be guarantors, they need to complete an application (updated if they are your tenants).  They also need to meet qualifications and requirements to rent both homes (3 times the income for both places).
pab

Registered:
Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #10 
Thank you everyone!. if anyone else has an opinion it
Is not too late!
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.

Apartment Finders > > Member Log-in > Free Trial Offer > Free E-newsletter > Customer Service > Get Free Stuff! > Run Credit Report > Rental Forms > Vacancy Center > Do-it-yourself > Evicting Your Tenant > Foreclosure Resources > Landlord Discussion Board > Income Tax Resources > Information Center > Join Landlord.com > Landlord Law > Library > Multi-family > Professional Advice > Rental & Property Mgmt > Rent Collection > Repair & Maintenance > Security Deposit > Software Center > Tenant Screening > Vacation Homes > What's New > Rental Agreements > Free Leases > Inside Our E-store > > Security Deposits > > Landlord Daily News > Rental Agreements >
LandscapingSanJose.net Resources: Cleaner Sunshine coast