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homelessjimmy40

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Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #1 

hello,

i have a rental unit in my back yard, older moble home, 2 additions on it, half new windows, furnace runs well, new appliances, but still is no palace, but i think affordable. i would also like to add i do make improvements, such as fresh paint outside, inside, new walls in living room, always trying to make it a little nicer. i personaly lived in it for 5 years myself and liked it. hence buying the house in front when owner passed on.

 my problem, in 6-7 years now, i have only had one decent tennant, who paid on time, wasnt a slob, wasnt a criminal, wasnt just a plain meathead.

 

i have had the mother who after told no pets, broght a dog. i have had the guy who got his fifth DUI while on suspended DL. (he's still doing time).

i have had the guy who begged for the place cuz he had no where else to stay localy, he lasted till he found a g/f and pulled the midnight move. i just had a "alternative lifestyle" set of girls leave today, and not on a good note. for you see i like to collect my rent, im funny like that, i expect them to pay.

 

this is a small community, everyone sorta knows your tennants are leaving before they are all the way out. i had 3 calls today when the eviction was going on. i wasnt in the mood to discuss renting at the moment.

 

so here i am venting, and the question that is finaly hitting me in the thick head is,...'do i just place the rental unit in the hands of a property management service?,..or do i tough it out , suck it up, clean it up and repaint and paper, again, do i need this hassle in my life or do i just plain let disassemble the building and forget it, game over.

 i do like having the little bit of extra income but am so tired of screening idiots and deadbeats (i'll pay ya tuesday for a hamburger today, kinda guy).

then when even trying to do all  you can do for them, having them stick it to you.

 

please leave some opinions, i would like to entertain other ideas than the ones im having. im just coming up blank. i know this is a low income, not very educated part of the planet here. but try and see if anyone can give me some pros and cons.    im just sick of being sick of it

 

thanks ~ol'homeless

kurt

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Posts: 137
Reply with quote  #2 

I rent a couple of duplexes in the bottoms of columbus ohio, and I can tell you it is often a pain in the bender trying to find a decent tenant.. I have had loosers galor, knuckle heads, liars ahoy, run forest run, filthy rotten trash can dweller, and plain old dealers and probably a little of prostitution done from tenants.. I shake my head, grovel, try to screen with rental application, and I know when some twit tries to tell me he has it going on because he has had a  temp job for about 3 months he's an idiot and most likely a liar and a dead beat.. It's tough when renting in low income areas, try to be fussy, but not to fussy cause then your units stay empty a long, long time and you end up paying the mortgage while going to work for les than $30,000 a year. Feel free to ask me questions and I'll try to answer them.

homelessjimmy40

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Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #3 

ive left it sit empty again now, i just dont care anymore, id rather demolish it that go thru it again. i had a couple i knew from a long time ago who just lost their home in our summer flood here in the mohawk valley in ny. they stopped out of the blue, said they hate the trash hole they ended up in. i know renting to ppl you know is bad business, and i know it will prob get trashed again. but just so i don t have to pay the heating bills i think im gonna ,let them rent it. i already made it crystal clear that i will bounce them faster than they can blink if they screw up. they assured me that they will do any small repair as he is a carpenter. i will take care of major projects. hopefully it will work out. but i dont have my hopes up as i have committed myself to the knowledge that it will get trashed again and again. until i want the whole unit removed from my backyard, this is the kind of crap im gonna have to deal with, as much as i hate it. i do believe they will stay a year or 2, ive never known them to move around much, and i know they both work steady.

i'll keep my fingers crossed

kurt

Registered:
Posts: 137
Reply with quote  #4 

You never know with people, they might turn out good specially if as long as you have known them they haven't moved a lot, it's a plus. Though it's still a gamble, and as far as them doing any work I advise you inspect his work to begin with just to make sure it's up to your likeing.

 

I think a lot has to do with society taking very little responsibility and court systems being lousy at doing the best they can at holding people responsible.. Meaning if some one destroys some thing as a renter the landlord can't have them immediatly arrested as a big department store can like wal-marts or some such thing.. I don't see the difference if a tenant breaks a door on a place and a shopper breaks a door in a store what's the diff?

 

Anyhow sorry for rambling, good luck with the tenants.

paralgl01

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Posts: 6
Reply with quote  #5 

No matter what you do, friends or not, get EVERYTHING in writing. Even if you enter into a "work for rent" agreement. Make sure whatever rental agreement you use covers all of the bases and protects both you and the tenant. I use a pre-printed form from Landlord.com and then add my own additions for any additional conditions. I also use the Zero drug policy form which gives me the right to bounce them if they are arrested for drugs or I start getting complaints from other tenants.


__________________
Carole
kurt

Registered:
Posts: 137
Reply with quote  #6 

Good idea puting zero tolerance in the lease, but problem is that's a tough thing to prove in eviction court.

 

As for in writing, that's a must no verbal lease, it's tough to prove and a pain, make every thing written. Least that way if you have to take them to court, you have the agreement in black and white, no he/she said.

withee1

Registered:
Posts: 13
Reply with quote  #7 

I have been a landlord for 17 years and had to learn from all my mistakes. First of all, never believe anything that a tenant tells you at your first meeting. Have them fill out an application thoroughly and check out everything on it. Call all references, even if out of state and do not rely on relatives or friends of the applicant. They will usually only say good things about the applicant and may even lie to help them out.

 

My applications have an authorization to release form to let me check online and at the state court system records online (available in some states). I check the person/persons out, including criminal/drug backgrounds, evictions, and judgements. I don't pay a lot of attention to traffic tickets, unless there are so many that the person would never have the money to pay rent. Be sure they are convicted/found guilty and not just charged.

 

I have had many applicants over the years tell me that they have good references and then find out via the court system, that they have been evicted (sometimes many times). Don't rent to evicted tenants, no matter what? They never change.

 

Don't necessarily take the first person that comes. They may be desperate and may be in the process of being evicted, etc. Don't believe what they tell you. Have them fill out an application and be careful of some that may put relatives as landlords. That may mean (but not always) that they can't make it on their own, especially if they are older than just starting out. Sometimes they will only give first names, wrong phone numbers, etc of their references, hoping you won't track them down.

 

I know what you mean about low income and small town rentals. I own 4 properties (14 separate apts) and rent to mostly lower income. Sometimes no matter what you do, a bad one slips in. Be sure you know all the landlord and tenant laws in your state.  I could write a book, as to all my experiences in being a landlord. I hope this all helps.              Cathy

OHlandlord

Registered:
Posts: 3,787
Reply with quote  #8 

Before I start...  Kurt, I love reading your posts on these sites.  But you forgot the numbnuts, those who hear voices, those who won't take their medications, and the desperate ones who call again and again and again...LOL

I too own rentals in a small town, in a rural county, and I manage low income rentals for others.  You see all kinds in this work.  Lots of times you get a real doosey in there.  They can be real PIAs.  You can only screen the tenants as best as you can and hope for the best.  The aggravation is part of the business.  Don't think that the better rentals get better tenants.  That's not always the case.  I've got some lovely 4 BD houses that I rent (including a gorgeous victorian).  They get trashed too.  It is always hard to find good tenants and sometimes when the market is tight and there's lots of competition, I have to relax my standards a bit.  But I won't rent to:  Anyone you feel sorry for.  (this is business, not charity)  Anyone who seems desperate.  (there's usually a reason, like they'll be evicted in 7 days)  Anyone who calls again and again.   (if they're PIAs while you're screening them, imagine how they'll be when they get into the place)  Any friends or family.  (a good way to lose those friends and alienate family members)  Anyone who lies on the application.  Anyone who gives you a sob story about the other LL.  (I'll call and hear the other half of the story)  Anyone with a mold story. (unless verified by the local health dpt.-How many of these have we heard?)  People with spotty employment histories.  Anyone who has been evicted.  Anyone who I can verify has stiffed another LL.  I'm sure there's more. They don't have to be perfect, but have a job, the means to pay the rent, a history of paying their bills, take care of the place (I'll drive by the place they're in now), and follow the rules.  Is that so much to ask.  Hey, thanks for letting me vent too!

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