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Anonymous

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Posts: 28
Reply with quote  #1 
Does anybody know is it legal to do an annual inspection of your property? I have a condominium with tenants both of which I inherited about 7 months ago their lease is up for renewal this summer provided they renew at the time I drop off the new lease I was going to do and inspection looking at the appliances, cabinets Plumbing Etc is that permissible in the state of California? If it is is there a checklist or something I can follow being my first time?
LLinVA

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Posts: 365
Reply with quote  #2 
Not in CA, but I am guessing there is just a requirement for a certain about of notice you have to give. In VA, we just have to let them know 24 hours before going in. I am guessing CA is a little stricter. You should be able to find it online to see what the exact requirement is.

I would look for general apartment moveout checklists and see what's appropriate for a routine inspection (when they aren't moving out). When we go in, we check smoke detector batteries, air filters, damage, look around for general messiness, uncleanliness that could attract pests, general lease violations, etc. Basically, we want to make sure they are taking care of the place and we still want them. 
RedLibrarian

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Posts: 29
Reply with quote  #3 
In California, a landlord must give 24 hour notice before entering a property for the following reasons:
   * Fix an emergency
   * Inspect the property
   * To make repairs or upgrades
   * To show property to prospective tenants

I'm not sure if the notice seems to be written or just verbal, but I think they're both a good idea.

It's 48 hours for the first move-out inspection. 

If you are coming up with a new lease, I would put in that you will do an inspection at least once a year (like on the anniversary of the move-in date) just to cover your bases. California is very strong on tenant rights. 

Welcome to landlording!!

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Property manager takes 10%, handles almost everything
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Anonymous

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Posts: 28
Reply with quote  #4 
Are you in California, do you have any of these things in your lease
RedLibrarian

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Posts: 29
Reply with quote  #5 
Yes, I am in California. Our lease does have those items in it. There are plenty of free templates online available for leases in every state.  If there's nothing already written about an annual walk-thru, you can use some of the blank spots to add it in. "Landlord reserves the right to conduct a walk-thru inspection at least once a year." 

I've been on the tenant side and it's nerve-wracking to have a landlord walk thru. But one of them put me ease at by saying, "I don't care if it's clean or not. I just want to make sure there aren't any leaks causing structural damage or that you're running a giant dog kennel or something." That made me relax. 

__________________
One unit in complex of 100+
2x2
Property manager takes 10%, handles almost everything
Owned since 2009



Lina_elias

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Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #6 
You can Send a letter letting them know you will be there for maintenance and to check the smoking detectors to make sure they are working properly
LLinVA

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Posts: 365
Reply with quote  #7 
You probably don't want to be that specific because if you then find something else such as a lease violation, they may challenge it since they were explicitly told your entry was for other things. I would keep it as general as possible such as "...to perform routine maintenance and inspection." The last thing you want is to find something like a pet they aren't supposed to have, evict them for a lease violation, and in court it all gets thrown out because you went out of your way to say it was only for A and B and what you found doesn't fall under A or B.
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