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CAlandlord123

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Posts: 7
Reply with quote  #1 
I would appreciate any advice here.  The hot water heater (which also supplies the heat through radiant heating) on the rental broke down.  We immediately hired a repair company to look at the problem and the unit needed a part. The part took 5 days to get and then another day to install.  So 6 days with no hot water and no heat.  We offered to put the tenants in a hotel but they didn't want to (they have a 2 year old and mom is 9 months pregnant).  We have GREAT tenants who stated they were fine.  Unit is now repaired and there are no problems. 
I want to send a letter to the tenants deducting money from next months rent as compensation for the hassle (and to document the incident in case there are ever problems on move out-been burned by lying tenants before).  My husband doesn't think it is necessary since the tenants stated everything was fine.  Any ideas?  Thanks 
OHlandlord

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Posts: 3,716
Reply with quote  #2 
You offered a hotel and they declined.  If you wish to offer a rent credit, I see no problem in that.  It would be a nice gesture considering being without heat or hot water for 6 days is quite an inconvenience.  But that is something you and your husband must agree on.  If he doesn't agree to that, maybe you two can compromise.  How about some other gesture for the tenants?  A gas card, a certificate for a grocery?  Personally, I would offer a partial rent credit since they did stay at the house during that time, but were inconvenienced.
CAlandlord123

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Posts: 7
Reply with quote  #3 

Thanks for the response.  Certificate of some kind is a good idea.  Would you still put something in writing?

OHlandlord

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Posts: 3,716
Reply with quote  #4 
I would put in writing that the tenants reported a problem on xx/xx date.  The repair company responded on xx/xx date.  A part was ordered on xx/xx date and tenants were offered accommodations, but refused.  The repair was affected on xx/xx date.  Then have the tenant sign off that the repair was made.
CAlandlord123

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Posts: 7
Reply with quote  #5 

Thanks for your help!

zlium

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Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #6 
Hi, I have the same predicament of how to reimburse the tenant's for their inconvenience.  I recently had two leaks caused by the water connector line to the toilet tank.  One was minor since the tenants were home but the second one was on a workday and tenants came home to find the home flooded from the second floor to the first floor with the ceiling falling on the first floor.  It has also caused damage to the renter's personal items like desk, 3-1 printer, toys, lamp, bed covers, etc.  I think it will take 2-3 weeks before the home will be dried out and reconstructed. My insurance covers lost rent, I was thinking of giving them a two-week rent credit.  Is this appropriate reimbursement for all their inconvenience and cost of damages to their personal items, in addition, to increase electrical bill due to the fans installed by the company drying the floors, walls and ceilings.  Please advise.  Thanks.
ahkenaten

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Posts: 156
Reply with quote  #7 
Two week rent credit seems a bit much, but I'm okay with everything else. Once you've itemized the damages to their personal items, the increase in electricity due to the repairs, and inconvenience, you should be good to go. Make sure to itemize all damages onto a document, along with the agreed upon price to cover everything. Then both parties should sign it and you keep the original copy. If this works, you'll have some very rare tenants. Most tenants would start taking the landlord/owner to court immediately without trying to work things out in a civil matter. Keepers...
zlium

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Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #8 
Thanks very much for your response.  Tenants were scheduled to vacate the rental end of July, before all the leaks happened.  The husband found work out of state.  But I will follow your recommendation and talked to them about the making a list of damages on their personal properties and an agreed upon price.  I was thinking of giving back their full security deposit when they leave, but that will be apples and oranges as their dog had done damages to the property like chewing on baseboards, doors, vertical and mini blinds; and carpets need to be shampooed and house thoroughly cleaned for the next tenant among other expenses.  
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