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mwong6783

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Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #1 
the landlord law was created for the tenant legally rob the landlord,is everybody agree?
OHlandlord

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Posts: 3,718
Reply with quote  #2 
Depends on the state.  Laws differ across the nation.  Some state laws are written to be more tenant friendly, other are more LL friendly.  While many LLs don't like they way the law is written in their area, you still have to work within the confines of the law.  Consider joining a LL group so your voice can be heard against laws that you disagree with.  Many Real Estate Investor groups have PACs (Political Action Committees) to change the law in your favor.  Change is slow, but Ohio's REIA has managed to change several laws.
mwong6783

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Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #3 
Thx for ur advise,I am the landlord in New York, is there anyway I can let people who can affect the unfair law to change,in New York the law is created to let the tenant rob the landlord thats for sure
mwong6783

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Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #4 
Did they ever think about the landlord have to pay mortgages ? Ny law just totally unfair
NewerLandlordinCA

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Posts: 11
Reply with quote  #5 
How do you report a renter who stayed 8 months without paying, damaged the property, and who is a attorney and put stuff on the docket and then drop it running up legal my fees.  However he has not paid a dime and is difficult to track down.  $30,000 out the door, yet the law did make him move, We are still out the money.  How do I keep others from dealing with this guy.  He even put all utilities in his mother in laws name.
mwong6783

Registered:
Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewerLandlordinCA
How do you report a renter who stayed 8 months without paying, damaged the property, and who is a attorney and put stuff on the docket and then drop it running up legal my fees.  However he has not paid a dime and is difficult to track down.  $30,000 out the door, yet the law did make him move, We are still out the money.  How do I keep others from dealing with this guy.  He even put all utilities in his mother in laws name.
mwong6783

Registered:
Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewerLandlordinCA
How do you report a renter who stayed 8 months without paying, damaged the property, and who is a attorney and put stuff on the docket and then drop it running up legal my fees.  However he has not paid a dime and is difficult to track down.  $30,000 out the door, yet the law did make him move, We are still out the money.  How do I keep others from dealing with this guy.  He even put all utilities in his mother in laws name.
mwong6783

Registered:
Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #8 
First you already make a mistake to rent to a lawyer or whatever , here is my experience stay away from those who wellknown the law such as the policemen ,fireman,legal secretary,doctor also the vertern,handicap ,I am not discriminate but if those people don't pay rent,it takes time to get them out,remember always ask for their utility bill at least 3 month under their name usually people don't pay rent don't pay their utility bill,my tenant don't pay rent but her credit score is 680,it just a example that she use your rent money to pay her credit card,hope it can help you
OHlandlord

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Posts: 3,718
Reply with quote  #9 
In most instances, an attorney is not needed in court if you are evicting for non-payment.  You just have to be sure to follow your state's guidelines on serving the notice and  filing the eviction.  Non-payment cases are fairly simple.  You can't legally discriminate against any class of people protected by fair housing laws - which means you have to rent to qualified handicapped and such.  But no law protects attorneys so you don't have to rent to them.  That said, I love to rent to police, firemen, veterans, and such.  Unless they are the top of the group, they always have a supervisor, they are easy to locate, don't quit their jobs easily (so its easier to go after them for money owed), etc.
mwong6783

Registered:
Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OHlandlord
In most instances, an attorney is not needed in court if you are evicting for non-payment.  You just have to be sure to follow your state's guidelines on serving the notice and  filing the eviction.  Non-payment cases are fairly simple.  You can't legally discriminate against any class of people protected by fair housing laws - which means you have to rent to qualified handicapped and such.  But no law protects attorneys so you don't have to rent to them.  That said, I love to rent to police, firemen, veterans, and such.  Unless they are the top of the group, they always have a supervisor, they are easy to locate, don't quit their jobs easily (so its easier to go after them for money owed), etc.
mwong6783

Registered:
Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OHlandlord
In most instances, an attorney is not needed in court if you are evicting for non-payment.  You just have to be sure to follow your state's guidelines on serving the notice and  filing the eviction.  Non-payment cases are fairly simple.  You can't legally discriminate against any class of people protected by fair housing laws - which means you have to rent to qualified handicapped and such.  But no law protects attorneys so you don't have to rent to them.  That said, I love to rent to police, firemen, veterans, and such.  Unless they are the top of the group, they always have a supervisor, they are easy to locate, don't quit their jobs easily (so its easier to go after them for money owed), etc.
mwong6783

Registered:
Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OHlandlord
In most instances, an attorney is not needed in court if you are evicting for non-payment.  You just have to be sure to follow your state's guidelines on serving the notice and  filing the eviction.  Non-payment cases are fairly simple.  You can't legally discriminate against any class of people protected by fair housing laws - which means you have to rent to qualified handicapped and such.  But no law protects attorneys so you don't have to rent to them.  That said, I love to rent to police, firemen, veterans, and such.  Unless they are the top of the group, they always have a supervisor, they are easy to locate, don't quit their jobs easily (so its easier to go after them for money owed), etc.
mwong6783

Registered:
Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #13 
Don't be silly about chasing the back rent , I am a New Yorker, even though you know when he work you have to go through a lot of law procedure and it is very complicated , I asked about it through a lawyer they told me don't expect too much, you finally wind up lose more money,you can bet if you don't believe me.again like my topic tenant is robing the landlord legally and they are portected by law.
mwong6783

Registered:
Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #14 
You are right no law protect the lawyer not to pay rent, it is true but when you dealing with a professional instead of to get your tenant out from 3 to 8 months,you going to need 8 months to get him out,that's the different between dealing with a know law person and a regular person ,you understand now ?handicap tenant the court always give extra time ,they can use a lot of excuse, vertern they serve the country , court usually give extra time,last time when I evict my tenant ,the court have to search my tenant is a vertern or not,you know why.actually good luck to you if the way you think is just that simple,I am sure you have not got thought all the pain that I had
IsaacAnge

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Posts: 13
Reply with quote  #15 
You're right that it depends on the state cause some state law are written to be more tenant friendly which many tenant knows.In Finland where i am a real estate agent too at http://www.vivalkv.fi/ i experience being a tenant and i love that in my place all the apartments are tenant friendly.
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