Start your membership account today...  Access to credit reports, 100's of rental specific forms, agreements, letters, checklists, how-to articles, guides, expert advice and much more!  Even a FREE, 3-day trial!

Not a Member?
Get a Free Trial Membership

  Get FREE Stuff! Run Credit Report Rental Forms  Shop & Buy Forms!  Advertise Your Rental Customer Care

Welcome to Landlord.com's Discussion Forum
Register Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
zlium

Registered:
Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi, my tenant is in violation of the lease agreement by having a cat in the rental. We are in the process of rerenting the place and have turned down prospective tenants because they have a cat.  

Current tenant is leaving and  we found out they have a cat in the house as a pet. I myself is allergic to cat, but more important is, I have experienced renting to tenants who are allergic to cats anhd they terminated their lease because the previous tenants in the rental had a cat.  In spite of vacuuming with hepa filter and having the carpets professionally clean with specially treated chemicals for pets, we could not prevent the allergy attacks by the tenants due to the cat. I will not be able to rent the place again to tenants who have an allergy to cat.  Additionally, I am afraid that if the new tenants (family of four with two young daughters, 5 and 8) have an allergy to cat, they will terminate their year lease.  What should I do as landlord to cover any future damages resulting from this violation?  Can I charge the tenants for the replacement of the carpets?  Carpets have pet urine stains as evidenced by the UV light that the carpet cleaners used during inspections.  Do you know if cats leave gander in hardwood floors?  How much can I deduct from their security deposit?

Thanks in advance for your assistance.
SparkRental

Registered:
Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #2 
As new prospects apply to live there, there's nothing that says you have to disclose that the last tenants had a cat.  If applicants ask, be honest, but there's no reason to advertise it. 
Ultimately it's on the tenants to ask if the prior tenants had a cat if they're allergic, not your responsibility to weed out every single applicant with allergies.
As for the security deposit, I think you have grounds to deduct for carpet replacement or at the very least a thorough shampooing.  They lied about having a pet, so their "normal wear and tear" argument about carpet damage is out the window.
Best of luck!

__________________
Brian Davis
SparkRental.com
zlium

Registered:
Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #3 
Thank you very much for the advise.   Can you deduct for the full amount of the carpet replacement?  Or do you have to prorate it based on the age of the carpets?  If so, what the standard depreciation life?  Thanks again.
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.

Apartment Finders > > Member Log-in > Free Trial Offer > Free E-newsletter > Customer Service > Get Free Stuff! > Run Credit Report > Rental Forms > Vacancy Center > Do-it-yourself > Evicting Your Tenant > Foreclosure Resources > Landlord Discussion Board > Income Tax Resources > Information Center > Join Landlord.com > Landlord Law > Library > Multi-family > Professional Advice > Rental & Property Mgmt > Rent Collection > Repair & Maintenance > Security Deposit > Software Center > Tenant Screening > Vacation Homes > What's New > Rental Agreements > Free Leases > Inside Our E-store > > Security Deposits > > Landlord Daily News > Rental Agreements >
LandscapingSanJose.net Resources: Cleaner Sunshine coast